© everlark
theurbanfoxwatcher:

Every year large numbers of fox cubs are rescued by well-meaning people who assume seeing a cub on it’s own means it has been orphaned. This is not true! Once the cubs are old enough to come above ground the vixen will lay away from them for most of the day to avoid drawing attention to the den. She will return to them once it’s safe to do so, and in the majority of cases cubs are best left where they are. Cubs cared for in captivity have a much lower chance of survival after release than cubs who grew up in the wild. Statistically these rescued cubs have a life expectancy after release of only 90 days.  
Only remove cubs as a last resort, if you know for sure the mother has died or if they appear starving, dehydrated, ill, injured or are in immediate danger. If you are at all unsure then monitor the cubs at the den over a period of a few days. If they remain bright, active and look well fed then you can be assured that they are being cared for. If in doubt leave well alone!
If you do come across genuine orphans then never try to care for them yourself. Raising fox cubs is a very difficult job that requires expert care to ensure the cubs get the correct nutrition and don’t become habituated to humans. The ultimate goal of raising orphaned cubs is always to get them back to the wild. 
If the cubs are past the weaning stage (from May onward) and you know for sure the mother has died then if possible it is always better to leave food at the den daily rather then taking them into captive care. It’s likely the father and other family members will still be bringing them food and they will have a much better chance of survival if they grow up in the wild. This should continue until July when the cubs will become fully independent. Only if their condition starts to deteriorate should you then contact a wildlife rehab. 
Guidelines on the rescue and rehabilitation of fox cubs
The Fox Project 
National Fox Welfare Society 
Please share this to get the word out! 

theurbanfoxwatcher:

Every year large numbers of fox cubs are rescued by well-meaning people who assume seeing a cub on it’s own means it has been orphaned. This is not true! Once the cubs are old enough to come above ground the vixen will lay away from them for most of the day to avoid drawing attention to the den. She will return to them once it’s safe to do so, and in the majority of cases cubs are best left where they are. Cubs cared for in captivity have a much lower chance of survival after release than cubs who grew up in the wild. Statistically these rescued cubs have a life expectancy after release of only 90 days.  

Only remove cubs as a last resort, if you know for sure the mother has died or if they appear starving, dehydrated, ill, injured or are in immediate danger. If you are at all unsure then monitor the cubs at the den over a period of a few days. If they remain bright, active and look well fed then you can be assured that they are being cared for. If in doubt leave well alone!

If you do come across genuine orphans then never try to care for them yourself. Raising fox cubs is a very difficult job that requires expert care to ensure the cubs get the correct nutrition and don’t become habituated to humans. The ultimate goal of raising orphaned cubs is always to get them back to the wild. 

If the cubs are past the weaning stage (from May onward) and you know for sure the mother has died then if possible it is always better to leave food at the den daily rather then taking them into captive care. It’s likely the father and other family members will still be bringing them food and they will have a much better chance of survival if they grow up in the wild. This should continue until July when the cubs will become fully independent. Only if their condition starts to deteriorate should you then contact a wildlife rehab. 

Guidelines on the rescue and rehabilitation of fox cubs

The Fox Project 

National Fox Welfare Society 

Please share this to get the word out! 

♡ 849 notes


To the anon 

I accidentally deleted your message =\ ups

I’m sorry, I deleted my post, and thank you for telling me. I don’t want to offend anyone =)



im-yours-for-life:

Coyle Crayolas

Color-Light Denim

Terry can sure rock a pair of jeans!

Well, hello there, Mr Starling. Lookin’ goooooooood. 

♡ 22 notes


knew it

knew it

♡ 113 notes


[x]

♡ 13,208 notes


maraudinglupin:

Robert is most displeased.

maraudinglupin:

Robert is most displeased.

♡ 37 notes


♡ 379 notes — tagged as: #JIM...STAHP


timminssidsrock:

Thief Takers - Series 1 - Episode 2.

DS Bob ‘Bingo’ Tate…

Appreciation spam post #9.

This concludes TSR’s Thief Takers S1 EP2 Bingo spamathon…

I think there is enough evidence here (see what I did there) to show that DS Tate is worthy of our appreciation.

filzlatsche Almost a 100 caps but still not enough for 100 pages. ;-) 

♡ 15 notes


timminssidsrock:

Thief Takers - Series 1 - Episode 2.

DS Bob ‘Bingo’ Tate…

Appreciation spam post #8.

♡ 20 notes


April 18 - Light Denim

(caps by ELV…I think)

♡ 11 notes — tagged as: #brendan coyle #the coyle crayolas #Hello there Terry #You look fiiiiiiiiiine


timminssidsrock:

Thief Takers - Series 1 - Episode 2.

DS Bob ‘Bingo’ Tate…

Appreciation spam post #7.

♡ 15 notes


timminssidsrock:

Thief Takers - Series 1 - Episode 2.

DS Bob ‘Bingo’ Tate…

Appreciation spam post #5.

(yes, yes I may have enjoyed Bingo looking through that broken window more than is deemed normal).

♡ 8 notes


timminssidsrock:

Thief Takers - Series 1 - Episode 2.

DS Bob ‘Bingo’ Tate…

Appreciation spam post #6.

♡ 9 notes


timminssidsrock:

Thief Takers - Series 1 - Episode 2.

DS Bob ‘Bingo’ Tate…

Appreciation spam post #4.

Keep ‘em coming Beef! 

♡ 6 notes


timminssidsrock:

Thief Takers - Series 1 - Episode 2.

DS Bob ‘Bingo’ Tate…

Appreciation spam post #3.

♡ 5 notes